4 Reasons Financial Literacy is Essential 

April is Financial Literacy Month! The purpose of Financial Literacy Month is to bring awareness to and promote the importance of establishing and maintaining financial healthy habits. Unfortunately, in our country, financial literacy has not been prioritized as an essential topic of learning in Public K-12 or higher education. Too many are left to fend for themselves when it comes to managing money.

“College graduates spent 16 years gaining skills that will help them command a higher salary; yet little or no time is spent helping them save, invest and grow their money.”
Vince Shorb, CEO, National Financial Educators Council

1. Personal Finance is 20% knowledge and 80% behavior

There’s a big misconception that personal finance is about math. Some people will shy away from financial topics because “they’re not a math person.” This could not be further from the reality. Avoiding personal finance because you’re not a math person, is like avoiding learning to drive because you’re not a car person. You don’t need to know how to rebuild an engine to get a license and become a safe driver.
Personal finance is much more about the habits and behaviors utilized with our limited resources. Some of these are so ingrained that you may not even see them as habits.

  • Do you use cash or debit/credit cards?
  • Do you have a written budget monthly or do you just pay bills as they come?
  • How often do you check your financial accounts? Do you use an aggregator like Mint?
  • How often do you check your credit score? Credit reports?

Many of our personal finance habits are learned when we’re children. In many ways, we model what we see from our parents and older siblings. If you grew up in a household of spenders or if you grew up in a frugal household, you’ll likely carry some of those same habits today. In order to change those habits, we have to have the requisite knowledge of how to properly manage our finances, but knowledge alone isn’t enough. Much like weight loss, knowing which foods are healthy and how to workout is only the first step. Making the behavior changes into consistent habits is what makes the difference.

2. Some of the most important financial decisions you make are when you’re young

Another reason financial literacy is so important is because there’s another big misconception:  ‘We can deal with the financial stuff when we’re older.’ If you talk to just about anyone over the age of 50 about money, they will tell you they wish they had learned about managing their money when they were younger. The chief financial complaint of older Americans is that they didn’t start saving or investing early enough.

40% of Americans are counting on the lottery, sweepstakes, getting married, or an inheritance to fund their retirement
– Money Magazine

Money Management should be a required curriculum in Junior High, High School and College in every school in America. If the purpose of school is to train you to prepare you for the real world, it doesn’t get much more real that how you manage your money.
Decisions such as your level of completed education, financing higher education, choice of career, location, marriage, children, first home purchase are all decisions that can have a serious impact on your long-term finances and for many are decisions made while relatively young. Don’t make the mistake of waiting until you’re “all grown” up to take responsibility for your finances, you’re already making important financial decisions.

3. Companies are providing fewer guaranteed benefits and shifting risk to employees

We’ll spare you the history lesson, but companies used to guarantee retirement benefits in exchange for years of service. They’re called pensions and they are extremely rare today. Essentially, if you worked for a company for, say 25 years, the company would fund a percentage of your salary in retirement until death. It was completely managed and paid for by the employer.

46% of Americans have less than $10,000 saved for retirement.
– 
Employment Benefit Research Institute

Today, you are totally responsible for your own retirement. Which means you have to save enough money so that you live off your savings. If you participate in your employer’s 401(k), you might get some help from your employer in the form of a 401(k) match, but that’s optional.  You choose what to invest in, how much to invest or whether to invest at all. You have to fund your own account and none of the investments are guaranteed, so all the risk and responsibility of funding your retirement is on your shoulders.
If that wasn’t depressing enough, the safety net of Social Security will likely not be enough to live on for anyone under the age of 50 today, if it exists at all. It is essential that we fund and properly invest early and often to manage that big responsibility.

4. Consumer debt is devastating wealth

Another reason it is vital to learn and master your personal finances is that it has never been easier in to spend money we don’t have. We live in a consumerism culture and our natural inclination is to acquire more stuff. In generations past, cash was the major option. If you wanted to purchase something that you didn’t have cash to purchase, you had to physically walk into a bank, convince the banker for a personal loan and fill out loads of paperwork, and/or put up collateral.

60% of Americans spend about equal to or more than their income.
– FINRA Investor Education Study

Today, in order to spend money you don’t have, you can use a piece of plastic in your wallet or swipe your phone. You may never have to physically walk into a bank. Financial products like credit cards, leasing, payday loans, student loans, interest-only mortgages, adjustable rate mortgages are all products created in the last 30 or so years which allow more and more people access to credit. The downside of having access to credit is that if not used responsibly, it reduces the ability to save and leads to crushing debt. We only have to look at the most recent economic recession of 2009 to see the impact of having too much debt.
 
From a financial standpoint, it’s not at all a rosy picture. There’s no sugarcoating the fact that 76% of US Citizens are living paycheck-to-paycheck. 20% of them earning more than $100K per year. That means more than 3 out of every 4 Americans are essentially broke. This is why financial literacy is essential in order to avoid the traps that many Americans find themselves in. Again, financial literacy is essential, but it’s just the first step. One has to use that knowledge to change their mindset and their behaviors in order to be truly successful. Finally, financial literacy is a continuous process, it’s not one course, it’s not one topic, it’s ongoing. We hope you take the first of many steps in that ongoing journey.

Financial literacy is not an absolute state; it is a continuum of abilities that is subject to variables such as age, family, culture, and residence. Financial literacy refers to an evolving state of competency that enables each individual to respond effectively to ever-changing personal and economic circumstances.
– Jump$tart

Baby on the Way! Financially Preparing for Maternity Leave

Thinking about having a child? Or maybe you’ve recently found out you’re pregnant! A range of emotions hit you – excitement, bewilderment, surprise, and anxiety – but after some time, your rational mind kicks in and asks,

“Wait, can I even afford to have a child?”

“How much should I save?”

“Does my job even have paid maternity leave?”

These are the questions my wife and I had when we first started to think about having our first child. There’s so much involved with bringing new life into the world, we really didn’t want to add financial stress to the list.

We knew we would have to rip off the band-aid and talk honestly about what would be ahead. So first, we did some research and we came across some disheartening news.

  1. According to a newly released US Department of Agriculture study, the average cost of raising a child from birth through age 17 is $233,610 for a middle-income married family with two children. (not including college or vacations).The average middle-income family will spend $12,680 on child-related expenses in their baby’s first year of life.
  2. According to Pew Research, The U.S. is the only industrialized nation in the world that does not mandate paid leave for new parents.
  3. Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) requires certain companies to offer 12 weeks unpaid leave. However, the vast majority of families cannot afford to go without a paycheck for three months, so many are forced back to work much sooner.

Pretty bad, right? The good news is that despite the costs and unfavorable policies, there are millions of American families raising happy, healthy children.

Below, my wife and I came up with the most important things to do and not do to financially prepare for maternity leave. We also created a FREE financial checklist, Baby on the Way! which covers many of these items below and more with additional resources. Fill in the information below to receive an email copy. 

1. DO: Check with your employer(s) for their maternity and paternity leave policies.

You’ll want to check with your human resources department to understand what their policies are and how they’ll apply to you. Maternity leave is actually considered to be a short-term disability, so you will want to understand whether you have or are eligible for short-term disability coverage, how long it lasts, and how much of your paycheck it will pay out (typically 50-60%). My wife was only eligible for short-term disability after being at her job for a full year.  We started trying once we knew she would be eligible.

You’ll also want to understand if any of your benefits will be impacted while you’re out. Accrued vacation? Sick days? Bonus? Health insurance? Life insurance? 

2. DO: Evaluate your health insurance coverage and check with your health insurance provider about maternity benefits they offer.

Along with speaking to your HR rep, also check with your health insurance provider. Many insurers offer benefits to assist you during pregnancy and post childbirth process, which can save you time and money. Benefits such as consultations, educational courses, breast pumps, and lactation consultants are just a few examples. The lactation consultant that my wife used two weeks after birth was as she claims, “A life saver”.

Also, make sure all healthcare providers are in-network. For example, make sure your obstetrician and their attending hospitals are in-network. There is nothing worse than getting a $2000 bill for your hospital stay that also comes home with you.

3. DO: Have a written monthly budget

Whether you have had a written budget before or not, it’s time to buckle down and write and stick to a monthly budget.

First, you’ll want to save as much as you can to prepare for a potential loss of income during pregnancy. You can start by cutting out non-essential spending to reallocate those dollars toward savings. Cutting cable, cooking at home, and reviewing monthly memberships is a good start. As a personal finance nerd, I was able to convince my wife to set up a baby fund before we started trying. It certainly came in handy when we discovered how expensive daycares were in our area.

Second, you can’t change what you don’t measure. You’ll likely have to reprioritize certain aspects of your finances. For example, if you were making additional payments on your student loans to pay them off quicker, you may want to reallocate that money towards an emergency fund or a separate baby savings fund.

Third, you want to have a pre-delivery and post-delivery budget to understand how your resources will be allocated before and after pregnancy. Particularly if your income will be impacted by short-term disability. What will it look like to live on 60% or less of your salary for a few months?

4. DON’T: Assume you can work up until pregnancy

Pregnancy can be quite unpredictable, so make sure you have flexibility in terms of your planning. You may be planning to work until your due date, but your little bundle of joy might have other plans! Understanding the financial implications of leaving work earlier will curb any additional anxieties if the situation arises.

5. DON’T: Go it alone. Lean on Your Village

Finally, and most importantly, you are not alone. Often times we have trouble asking for help, but this is an undertaking that is beyond one individual. The African proverb, “It takes a village to raise a child.” is so accurate. You’ll need to lean on others during this process. Often times we forget, the vast majority of the time, people are ecstatic to help us. Put yourself in their shoes. If you had a pregnant friend or family member ask you to give them a ride to a doctor’s appointment, how would you feel? Likely, you would be happy to help!

Financially speaking, baby showers are a great way for the ‘village’ to help you get what you need to prepare for the child’s arrival, but be sure to focus your baby registry on needs, not wants. Also, barring safety concerns with items such as cribs and car seats, second-hand items are a great way to save money.

For those in your village that may not be able to afford more expensive items on a baby registry, diapers, baby clothes, home-cooked meals, and babysitting are great low-cost substitutes. Allowing people to help and contribute, brings them joy and gives them a stake in the process and takes some financial burden off of you.  Find out who in your village has had a child three to six months ahead of you — they may be looking for someone to unload all of their baby clothes that no longer fit!

Again, millions of people have gone through this process and came out the other side and many of them have less financial resources. The best thing to do is to plan ahead and get organized. We wish you good luck!

For more additional tips and resources, be sure to fill in the information below to email a copy of our FREE Baby on the Way! Checklist.

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9 Questions to Ask Your 401k Provider

When was the last time you really looked at your 401(k)? Not just the balance, but a good hard look at the actual investments and the performance. For most people, the answer is ‘not recently!’ It’s not necessarily because we don’t care. On the contrary, if you are reading this, you obviously do, but there’s confusion about what’s in our 401(k), how it works and what questions to ask.

We’ll tackle those topics in simple terms so you can confidently make that phone call and get the specific answers you need to Conquer Your 401(k). Before we get into the questions for your 401(k) provider, let’s start with the basics.

What is a 401(k)?

Many companies offer employees a retirement benefit plan, typically a 401(k) plan or a 403(b) (not-for-profit) plan. These are simply tax-advantaged retirement accounts which are managed by your employer. Both you and your employer can contribute a percentage of your paycheck to the plan. The money can be invested in the stock market (stocks, bonds, mutual funds, etc.) to grow and compound for the purpose of income in retirement. Starting as early as possible and investing consistently is the best approach in building a solid retirement nest egg.

Who is your service provider?

Often, these companies are referred to as the Plan Administrator (e.g. Fidelity, Vanguard, TIAA, Mass Mutual, Principal). This is the company that is facilitating the 401(k) plan on behalf of your employer. You’ll likely receive statements from them or have to log into their website to get your balance. This is also the company that you’re going to call to get specific answers about your plan.

Okay, so we got the basics down, we know what the 401(k) is and who our service provider is, now let’s get you prepared to ask the questions to Conquer Your 401(k).

Preparing For The Call

Find your service provider’s phone number. It may be specific for your company, so whether it’s a quarterly statement, an email you receive, the service provider’s website, or through your HR department, you should be able to find a toll-free number for your 401(k) service provider. It’s actually important to call because your 401(k) isn’t an easy topic and the rules of your plan can change, so you want to make sure you’re getting the most up-to-date information about your specific plan. Plus, it’s your money, you deserve to talk to a human!

Our 9 questions about your 401(k) are covered three major topics:

  • Current 401(k) Account Status
  • Investment Risk and Performance
  • Additional Benefits and Tools.

We’ll cover three questions of the first topic in this post and you can find the remaining six questions in our FREE guide Conquer Your 401(k).

Current 401(k) Status

Question #1: What is the current balance in my account?

Don’t be ashamed if you don’t know the current balance of your 401(k). It’s not uncommon to be automatically enrolled into your 401(k) plan. If you don’t have a login for the website, you can register online and/or answer security questions over the phone.


Question #2: What is my contribution percentage?

This is the percentage of your paycheck that is being invested in your 401(k). Ideally, you would want to contribute in order to maximize your employer match. So if your employer matches at 5%, you would contribute 5% of each paycheck and your employer match would total of 10%. We recommend working up to 15% (combined employee and employer contribution) over time.

Question #3: What am I currently invested in?

Now we get into a little more complexity. It’s important to understand which investments are part of your 401(k). If you were automatically enrolled in your plan and did not choose your investments it’s likely you would be invested in a Target Date Fund:

Target Date Funds are collections of investments designed to manage risk for a particular retirement date. The closer the fund is to the retirement date, the less risk in the portfolio. This is a one-stop-shop option for those not interested in creating a diversified portfolio on their own. One would select the Target Date investment that matches closest to the year they would turn 65 years old. (i.e. 2050 Retirement Fund)

Target Date Funds are quality options for beginner investors, particularly if you are less interested in following and updating your investments quarterly. If you’re not invested in a Target Date Fund, you’ll need to assess your current investments. You want to determine whether you have adequately diversified your investments and whether the amount of risk is adequate for your situation.

In Questions 4 – 9, we cover risk, performance, and additional benefits to inquire about. We want to our guide to be your cliff notes to prepare you for that phone call. All 9 questions are covered in our FREE Guide Conquer Your 401(k).

3 Ways to Increase Your Compensation Without Talking to Your Boss

Not everyone gets salary increases every year, but that doesn’t mean you can’t increase your total compensation. Most of the focus on compensation is on salary, but your employee benefits can account for as much as 30% of your total compensation.

Remember when you started at your company and in your orientation, you had a meeting with HR to discuss your benefits? They likely gave you a thick folder of information and depending on how long you’ve been with your employer, you may not remember a single thing from that meeting, but that folder is likely buried at the bottom of your desk drawer. You may not realize in the fine print of those handouts are some really important benefits that can either put money back in your pocket or improve your overall financial standing. If you want to increase your compensation without having to talk your boss, it’s time dust off that folder and/or set up a meeting with HR. 

We’ve created a detailed FREE guide to maximizing your employee benefits, which explains common employee benefits in plain English, but here are three of the most unused benefits which cost can cost us thousands of dollars each year.

1. 401(k) and Employee Matching

If your employer matches your 401(k) up to a certain percent, you are actually turning down free money if you don’t take full advantage of it. Let’s give an example of how this works:

Example: John Doe makes $50K in salary. His employer matches his 401k at 5%. So if he invest 5% ($50K * 5% = $2,500), his company will match that investment up to $2,500. If he invests less, the company will match less.

So in that example, if John decides not to invest in his company’s 401(k), he just reduced his total compensation by the $2,500 match each year.

We recommend building a base emergency fund prior to long-term investing, but it is important to take advantage of your company match as soon as possible.

2. Wellness Programs

If you have health insurance through your employer individually or your family, your employer likely pays 70-80% of your health insurance premium. The portion that comes out of your paycheck is closer to 20-30% of the total cost. This is important because that means your employer is financially incentivized to have a healthier workforce. Healthier employees equal lower insurance premiums for the company. In order to accomplish this, employers have created incentives to get you healthier and many of these can take the form of financial incentives.  Examples include discounts or reimbursements for gym memberships, discounts on home fitness equipment, healthcare reimbursements, cash rewards, weight loss programs, smoking cessation programs. Think about it this way, your employer is willing to pay you more money to be healthy.

3. Corporate Discounts/Partnerships

Most people are familiar with receiving employee discounts if they purchase products or services from their employers. However, employees are less familiar with discounts they may receive from other companies because of their employer. Particularly with larger companies, they often have sizable contracts with different vendors and often as part of that contract, they will offer discounts to their client’s employees as well. So you may able to receive a 20% discount on your monthly cell phone or cable bill because your employer has a contract with Verizon. It’s not solely cell phone or cable bills either, this may include electronics, rental cars or even group insurance policies such as auto, home, and life insurance. Also, employers sometimes have internal online portals where you can purchase products with the discounts built-in instead of purchasing in-store or from the company websites directly.

Saving money on your expenses, particularly fixed monthly bills, is not much different than increasing your salary. Instead of increasing the income bucket, you reduce the expense bucket. The result is the same, more money in your pocket. So whether it’s retirement, wellness programs or corporate discounts, make sure you dust off that HR packet in your desk drawer or give a call to HR to learn more about your benefits and how you can increase your total compensation.

For more detailed information on maximizing employee benefits, check out our FREE 15-page guide including details on Retirement, Health, Life, Disability benefits and more, which we call Give Yourself A Raise!

3 Money Lessons for Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is my favorite holiday. It’s a holiday with the least pretense or pomp and circumstance and is almost exclusively focused on family, gratitude and quality time (a.k.a. the things that really matter). That focus is also extremely important for our finances. There is no shortage of distractions when it comes to things we can do with our money, so here are three lessons Thanksgiving can teach us about money.

1. An Attitude of Gratitude

Pilgrims arrived and anchored near Cape Cod, MA in 1620 arriving just before a brutal winter, which many spent on the ship. Between the 66-day voyage and that brutal first winter, half of the 102 passengers and 26 crew members died. In the Spring, when the remaining passengers moved ashore, they were greeted by Natives, who taught them to hunt, fish, farm and survive in this new land. Thanksgiving’s history begins with a celebratory feast where Pilgrims invited local Native tribes to a feast to celebrate their first successful harvest. These were not people of wealth or high status, they went through a traumatic voyage and a brutal winter and lost many lives. One would imagine they would be heavily reconsidering their decision to leave everything they knew in England to risk life and limb for freedom and opportunity. They were grateful for their freedom, they were grateful the gift of life and they were grateful to their gracious hosts, who without them would have certainly not survived.

The money lesson here is gratitude. Gratitude is free, unlimited and enhances your life immeasurably.

Gratitude unlocks the fullness of life. It turns what we have into enough, and more. It turns denial into acceptance, chaos to order, confusion to clarity. It can turn a meal into a feast, a house into a home, a stranger into a friend. – Melody Beattie

2. The Beauty of Simplicity

There are only three requirements for Thanksgiving – food, family, and fun. Each one of those can take different forms. Whether you have a turkey or go vegetarian. Whether you have a traditional family, or your own community, and fun can mean anything from falling asleep watching football on the couch to card games and uncomfortable conversations about politics. Either way, there are no religious requirements, expectations of gift exchanges, costumes, candy, ceremonies or fireworks. Thanksgiving is simply about spending quality time with the people you love and sharing a feast. There is a simplicity of Thanksgiving that makes it so appealing and universal.

The money lesson here is that money is just a resource if we break it down to its simplest form. Money doesn’t define who we are and it does not make us better than anyone else. Money doesn’t have to be complex and complicate our lives. If we use money wisely, we use it as a resource build or enhance things of real value like time, relationships and community. The very same things we are grateful for on Thanksgiving.

 

3. Death to Black Friday

Commercial interests have all but ruined Christmas, but over the last decade, those same commercial interests have made a full push to commercialize Thanksgiving. People are actually leaving their loved ones to stand in line at a retail store overnight to buy products. Think about the irony of leaving the dinner table after giving thanks for everything and everybody in your life to stand in line at a store overnight to buy more stuff.

[bctt tweet=”Don’t go from being grateful for what you have on Thurs, to buying things you don’t need on Fri!” username=”moneyspeakeasy”]

Make no mistake, Black Friday is a retail scam. It’s been proven that major retailers steadily raise their prices in the weeks and months before Thanksgiving for the appearance of steep discounts for Black Friday. Let’s not forget the reason for the season – Thanksgiving is about spending time with your loved ones, not camped outside of Target or Wal-Mart. One more benefit to not Black Friday shopping is that fewer employees will have to work crazy overnight hours on a holiday! Let these folks spend time with their loved ones.

So for this Thanksgiving, both with your loved ones and your wallets, be thankful for what you have, enjoy the things that really matter and let’s all sleep in or play flag football on Friday morning!

4 Money Lessons from the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election

The 2016 Presidential Election was historic on multiple fronts. Two of the most unpopular candidates battled in one of the most contentious, divisive and unconventional campaigns in modern history. For some, the result was a deeply shocking and painful event, for others it was redemption for voices long ignored. In all, nearly 120 Million Americans voted and the popular vote was separated by less than 200,000 votes, which is about the population of Little Rock, Arkansas. Regardless of your politics or preference of candidate, there’s no question that the country is divided politically. Whether you’re extremely disappointed or excited by the result there are lessons to be learned from the election and how it can affect our wallets and thus our livelihoods. How can the lessons from this election make us better managers of our finances?

1. Conventional Wisdom Isn’t Always Wise

Nearly every political expert and reputable polling firm who had been polling voters on a weekly basis for 18 months were completely wrong about the actual results of the election. Polling models that were used for the electorate in 2008 and 2012, became obsolete in 2016. Conventional wisdom can often be generalized and not specific to our individual situation.

There are certain standards of conventional wisdom in our finances that are also outdated or need to be challenged based on our individual situations. For example, conventional wisdom often stresses going to the best college one can get into (regardless of cost), pursuing a degree in a field of interest (regardless of expected future salary). This is not to say that people shouldn’t go to college or pursue a major solely based on expected future salary. It is to say that mode of thinking was developed at a time when people could pay their full student tuition by working part-time. That’s a 1970’s/80’s model, which needs to be challenged and may not take into account the realities of increased tuition costs and the impact of student loan debt on your future livelihood.

Our motto is Reject the Status Quo. In order to manage your finances well, there are times when you’ll make decisions that are not popular. The status quo embraces consumerism culture in which many people equate spending with projecting wealth or building relationships. It may be tough to navigate being the odd one out if you don’t subscribe to that mode of thinking. You may find that unnecessary spending actually doesn’t project wealth or make you happier, but rather delays and extends the time it takes for you to reach your personal and financial goals.

2. Prepare for the Unexpected

To say that Donald Trump becoming the 45th President of the United States was unexpected is a dramatic understatement, but life can often be very unpredictable. It was the Greek Philosopher Heraclitus who said, “Change is the only constant in life.” Sometimes change is good and sometimes it isn’t, but regardless, we have to plan for the unexpected. [bctt tweet=”Being unorganized with your finances is like playing Russian Roulette. ” username=”moneyspeakeasy”]

One of the lessons learned from the 2008 Great Recession was the people that were impacted the most were folks who carried high levels of debt and lived above their means. That’s not a judgment on them personally, but we need to ask ourselves if we have recession-proofed our finances. The following questions can help you assess your readiness:

Do you have 3-6 months living expenses in an emergency fund?

Do you have more than one source of income?

Do you have a written budget and track your spending?

Do you have life and disability insurance?

Do you have revolving credit card debt?

3. Depending on Government is a Losing Strategy

One of the truly negative impacts of having a divided country and a divided government is that even topics of general consensus may not get accomplished. There are serious financial issues, such as the cost of higher education, the cost of healthcare, student loan debt, social security, increasing wages and tax reform that can have dramatic effects on our finances, both positive and negative.

We believe the best plan of action is to treat your finances as if you will not get any assistance from the government and if you do, it will be a bonus. If you are under the age of 50, you should have no expectation that you’ll receive any social security benefits in retirement. If you have student loans, you should have no expectation that the government will help reduce the cost or forgive any portion of it, unless you are in a loan forgiveness program, have it in writing and understand the nuances.

The point is that our government is not a nimble organization, even when there is a consensus. Big changes can often take years, if not decades. Therefore government assistance should not be an important part of any financial planning.

4. Your Money, Your Values

Finally, if you want to know what someone truly values, you may listen to their words, you may even look into their actions, but one of the most revealing aspects of a person’s values is their spending. As they say, follow the money! We may vote for a Presidential candidate every four years, but we vote daily with our financial resources. [bctt tweet=”The more we control of our finances, the more resources we can direct toward causes we value.” username=”moneyspeakeasy”] For example, if a company decided to move a factory overseas or company funded organizations that were contrary to your values, an organized voter base could decide they were no longer willing to purchase products from that company and impact that decision. Just as many Americans believe that every vote counts, your dollars and purchase decisions count. Make sure your bank statement reflects what you value most.

Financial Infidelity Part 2: How My Lie About Money Almost Ended Our Relationship

 
Money is one of the leading causes of stress in relationships. In Part 1, we discussed how and why financial infidelity occurs and how to overcome it. Part 2 is a personal story from my wife, who had to confront and overcome struggles with money in order for our relationship to survive and thrive. Continue reading “Financial Infidelity Part 2: How My Lie About Money Almost Ended Our Relationship”